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9th Annual Student Scholar Essays
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9th Annual Saffran Conference

10th Annual Saffran Conference

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10th Annual Eleanor M. Saffran Conference

Day One Presentation One: John Whyte

John Whyte, M. D., Ph.D., is a physiatrist and experimental psychologist specializing in traumatic brain injury rehabilitation. He is the founding director of the Moss Rehabilitation Research Institute, begun in 1992. His research focuses on cognitive impairment after TBI, including assessment and treatment, with a major emphasis on disorders of attention, executive function, and consciousness. In addition to his empirical research, he has a longstanding interest in the special challenges posed by rehabilitation treatment trials, the difficulties in defining rehabilitation treatments, the role of theory in guiding rehabilitation research, and the process of translating scientific advances into practical rehabilitation treatment interventions.

Day One Presentation Two: Myrna Schwartz

Myrna Schwartz, Ph.D., is the Associate Director of Moss Rehabilitation Research Institute (MRRI) and Research Professor of Rehabilitation Medicine at Thomas Jefferson University.  She has been at MRRI since 1986, before which she earned a Ph.D. in experimental psychology (University of Pennsylvania), completed a fellowship in behavioral neurology (Johns Hopkins School of Medicine), and held faculty appointments at Hopkins Medical School, Swarthmore College, and University of Pennsylvania.  At MRRI, Dr. Schwartz heads the Language and Aphasia Lab which conducts basic and applied research on language processing impairments in stroke. She has pioneered the use of convergent behavioral, computational, and neuroimaging methods to investigate how the mind and brain access the names of things. Dr. Schwartz is also co-founder and Research Director of the Moss Aphasia Center, which since 1998 has provided community-based clinical, educational, psychosocial and research services to families living with aphasia.

Day One Presentation Three: Ruth Fink

Ruth Fink, MA, CCC-SLP, is the Clinical Director of MossRehab Aphasia Center and a senior staff research clinician of Moss Rehabilitation Research Institute. She has been treating individuals with aphasia in various settings since 1969. In 1989, she joined the staff of Moss Rehabilitation Research Institute and began to conduct aphasia research under the mentorship of Dr. Myrna Schwartz. As a Research Speech-Language Pathologist she has served as Co-PI and Project Director on federally funded treatment grants in the areas of sentence processing disorders, word retrieval disorders and computer -assisted applications. Her work has appeared in peer-reviewed publications such as Aphasiology, Clinical Aphasiology, Brain and Language, American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, Neuropsychological Rehabilitation, and Topics in Stroke Rehabilitation. She has also presented at national and international conferences. Since 1996, Ms. Fink has directed the clinical activities of the MossRehab Aphasia Center, a specialized program which aims to implement research-based treatments into clinical practice. Ms. Fink is a member of the Academy of Aphasia, the American Speech– Language- Hearing Association, a Special Interest Division 2 (SID 2) affiliate of Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, and a founding member and affiliate of AphasiaAccess, a new alliance of Life Participation providers. She earned a MA at Temple University and a BA at Montclair State College, both in Speech-Language Pathology.

Day One Presentation Four: Anastasia Raymer

Anastasia Raymer, Ph.D., CCC-SLP, is Professor and Chair of the Department of Communication Disorders & Special Education at Old Dominion University (B.S.Ed. Communication Disorders, University of Wisconsin; M.A. and Ph.D. in Speech Pathology, University of Florida). Her research examines means to optimize rehabilitation of aphasia and limb apraxia. Her work has been supported by the NIH (NIDCD) and the Dept. of Defense. She has published more than 75 papers and chapters and has given hundreds of talks on her research. She is president of the Academy of Neurologic Communication Disorders and Sciences, and a Fellow of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association.

Day One Presentation Five: Ron Gillam

Ron Gillam, Ph.D., holds the Raymond and Eloise Lillywhite Endowed Chair in the Department of Communication Disorders and Deaf Education at Utah State University. His research primarily concerns information processing, language assessment, and language intervention with school-age children who present language impairments and learning disabilities. Dr. Gillam has published two books, three tests, and more than 100 articles and book chapters.  He has served as an associate editor of the Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, the American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, and Topics in Language Disorders. Ron is an ASHA Fellow, and he has received numerous teaching and research awards, including the 2009 Robins Award for the outstanding researcher at Utah State University.

Day One Presentation Six: Jane Marshall

Jane Marshall, Ph.D., is a Professor of Aphasiology at City University London, UK.  She qualified as a speech and language therapist in 1987.  She worked in the aphasia unit of an acute hospital for three years before undertaking a PhD exploring sentence processing impairments in aphasia.  Her post-doctoral research has investigated numerous aspects of aphasia, including jargon aphasia, aphasia in bilingual speakers and in Deaf users of sign language.  All her work has placed a strong emphasis on the clinical needs of people with aphasia and their remediation. With colleagues, she has run several therapy projects, evaluating treatments for word retrieval, writing and for compensatory modalities such as gesture. Her current research is investigating technological applications in aphasia therapy.  For example, she investigated the remote delivery of therapy, using internet video conferencing technology, and explored the benefits of a computer gesture therapy tool for people with severe aphasia.  A current project is evaluating a virtual communication environment for people with aphasia.   Jane teaches on all the Speech and Language Therapy programs at City University London, and supervises numerous MSc and PhD students. She is a member of the Editorial Board of the journal Aphasiology.  In 2007 she won the Robin Tavistock Award for her work in Aphasia, and in 2009 was made a Fellow of the Royal College of Speech and Language Therapists.

Day One Presentation Seven: Branch Coslett

Branch Coslett, M.D., is a Cognitive/Behavioral Neurologist with more than 30 years of experience in cognitive neuroscience research at Temple University, Moss Rehab Research Institute and the University of Pennsylvania where he is the William N. Kelley Professor of Neurology. His work has focused on theoretically motivated investigations of subjects with brain disorders as well as non-invasive brain stimulation with Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) and transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS) in normal volunteers and subjects with a variety of brain disorders. His work has explored a number of topics including body representations, neglect, disorders of action, and acquireaJJd language disorders such as aphasia and alexia. He has studied the role of TMS as a treatment for chronic aphasia.  His clinical efforts focus on patients with cognitive/behavioral disorders from stroke, traumatic brain injury and neurodegenerative diseases.

Day Two Presentation One: Ron Gillam

Ron Gillam, Ph.D., holds the Raymond and Eloise Lillywhite Endowed Chair in the Department of Communication Disorders and Deaf Education at Utah State University. His research primarily concerns information processing, language assessment, and language intervention with school-age children who present language impairments and learning disabilities. Dr. Gillam has published two books, three tests, and more than 100 articles and book chapters.  He has served as an associate editor of the Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, the American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, and Topics in Language Disorders. Ron is an ASHA Fellow, and he has received numerous teaching and research awards, including the 2009 Robins Award for the outstanding researcher at Utah State University.

Day Two Presentation Two: Jane Marshall

Jane Marshall, Ph.D., is a Professor of Aphasiology at City University London, UK.  She qualified as a speech and language therapist in 1987.  She worked in the aphasia unit of an acute hospital for three years before undertaking a PhD exploring sentence processing impairments in aphasia.  Her post-doctoral research has investigated numerous aspects of aphasia, including jargon aphasia, aphasia in bilingual speakers and in Deaf users of sign language.  All her work has placed a strong emphasis on the clinical needs of people with aphasia and their remediation. With colleagues, she has run several therapy projects, evaluating treatments for word retrieval, writing and for compensatory modalities such as gesture. Her current research is investigating technological applications in aphasia therapy.  For example, she investigated the remote delivery of therapy, using internet video conferencing technology, and explored the benefits of a computer gesture therapy tool for people with severe aphasia.  A current project is evaluating a virtual communication environment for people with aphasia.   Jane teaches on all the Speech and Language Therapy programs at City University London, and supervises numerous MSc and PhD students. She is a member of the Editorial Board of the journal Aphasiology.  In 2007 she won the Robin Tavistock Award for her work in Aphasia, and in 2009 was made a Fellow of the Royal College of Speech and Language Therapists.

Copyright Eleanor M. Saffran, All Rights Reserved 2015